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Aug 26, 2014 / 543,010 notes
paintdeath:

Gay rights activists kiss as they are detained by police officers during a gay rights protest in St. Petersburg

If this is real then….YYYYAAAASSSSS!
Aug 22, 2014 / 69,644 notes

paintdeath:

Gay rights activists kiss as they are detained by police officers during a gay rights protest in St. Petersburg

If this is real then….YYYYAAAASSSSS!

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Aug 22, 2014 / 114,340 notes

Preach brother.

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Aug 20, 2014 / 2,171 notes

the-old-folk-blues said: Why is it that the ethnicity of your characters is so important to visual adaptions when you rarely, if ever, mention it in your prose?

neil-gaiman:

muchymozzarella:

neil-gaiman:

I don’t really understand the question. If the ethnicity of the characters wasn’t in the prose it wouldn’t be mentioned at all in the adaptations and nobody would care. If you are paying attention you will find all sorts of people in the books, with all sorts of backgrounds. 

And it probably came from comics, in which I could have someone drawn as being part of a particular race or ethnicity and then not have to have them talk about being part of that ethnicity, but simply get on with the business of being in the story and behaving as that person, with that point of view, which would include ethnicity, would behave.

It’s important because representation

And also because I was stupid enough to think Fat Charlie was white for the entirety of Anansi Boys until in hindsight I realized what having Anansi for a dad would obviously mean 

Neil may not always say explicitly what the characters’ ethnicities are but he implies them enough, and if you’re paying attention, you’ll be able to figure it out. 

And maybe this is difficult to understand but as someone who’s grown up a bibliophile, who was so bombarded by white characters that I default to Caucasian in my head even when the character is decidedly nonwhite, it’s important to shake off those years of idiotic Western/Caucasian-centricity by portraying characters as other ethnicities.

Exactly.

This is a really interesting exchange to me, as I run the exact opposite. I often times default characters to a different ethnicity entirely, despite the fact that they may be described in the prose as being Caucasian.  I’m not exactly sure why I do that, except it might be that I grew up in a multiracial household, so I have a tendency to automatically assume that book characters are the same. Then I’m always shocked when I see a drawing or a film adaption of a character. I’m always surprised by the westernization of everything, and I don’t know WHY I’m surprised. I’m generally not naive, but perhaps I am too optimistic.

Aug 11, 2014 / 150,132 notes

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visualechoess:

Lofoten islands, Norway - by: Sergey Bogomyako
Aug 8, 2014 / 10,896 notes
Aug 5, 2014 / 54,508 notes

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mistress-of-all-wanderlust:

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Aug 5, 2014 / 122,420 notes

mistress-of-all-wanderlust:

This message brought to you by Princess Ariel

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Aug 5, 2014 / 233 notes
Aug 5, 2014 / 10,310 notes

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